Marketing For A Dental Practice

Facebook is extremely easy to use. From CEOs to 90-year-old great-grandfathers, in big cities and on remote islands a hemisphere away, the world uses Facebook. But when it comes to using Facebook to market businesses—including dental practices—it’s not as easy as it might look.

Questions abound.

How often should we post on Facebook? What sort of content should we post? How do we grow our audience? Will it even make any difference to the health of our practice? This article breaks down these questions and more for dentists.

How often should my practice post on Facebook? According to a recent Adweek article, studies show that Facebook is most effective if you post twice per day. After that, “likes” and “comments” begin to drop off. Experts suggest developing a schedule and sticking to it. Facebook makes it easy to be consistent by allowing businesses to post either immediately or at a future date and time. This way, you could schedule weeks of posts to hit twice a day, every day.

What should I post? You can share promotions, referral bonuses, new staff members and other announcements on your feed. You can share facts on dental health studies that will interest your readers. At WPI Communications, we recommend that our newsletter clients post interesting facts and highlights from their monthly or quarterly newsletter articles. Examples of articles from a recent Pediatric Dental Bites eNewsletter include

The Hidden Dangers of Flavored Waters
Get the Vitamin D Needed for Healthy Teeth
A Diet That Is “Teeth-Safe”
Save That Knocked Out Tooth!
Nerve Treatment in Primary Teeth
Every Six Months: The Importance of Routine Dental Care

Each of these articles has facts that can be shared in a quick Facebook post, with a link to the dentist’s Web site for the full article. For example, for “A Diet That is ‘Teeth-Safe,’” you could ask the question in your newsfeed: “What are the top 10 tooth-safe foods for children?” Or, “What’s one food that every parent should avoid feeding their child?” These provocative questions will prompt readers to engage with your content, “like” your page, “share” your content and, most importantly, seek your practice for care.

Don’t forget to share. Sharing posts from trusted dental sources, such as the American Dental Association Facebook page, is a great way to keep quality content on your newsfeed. But you don’t have to stick to “business.” You can share content from local media, such as fun family events for the weekend, a “this day in history” post or other fun and useful tidbits.

Don’t make them work for it. Be sure that any links you post work and are easy to navigate. There are many ad-heavy social media sites that serve only to frustrate readers because the pages don’t load or don’t go where they’re supposed to go.

Look at what works. Look at the posts that get the most “likes” and “shares,” as well as the posts that get the least. This will tell you what type of content your audience cares about.

Visiting a dental clinic is about more than just getting your teeth cleaned. A visit to the dentist means you are going to get a complete and total oral hygiene and health screening. A common misconception is the best dental care comes with the highest fees. Such is not the case at all.

Quite a number of excellent dental clinic facilities come with affordable pricing. The key here is to always look for the best dentist who has long since established a reputation for offering high quality service to those in need.

This process does start finding a dentist accepting new patients. As much as we wish all dentists are able to see all patients who request an appointment, this might not be possible. A dentist could be semi-retired, have other pressing responsibilities outside the clinic, or he/she simply may not have any room on the appointment schedule for the foreseeable future. So, do not automatically assume a dentist can take you right away if you have not seen that dentist before.

To find a dentist accepting new patients, you simply do have to place a few phone calls and ask. The receptionist will surely give you an answer immediately. If you have to leave a message, you can do so. Someone is going to get back to you if there are slots open. When a response is not given right away, do not automatically assume this is not a dentist accepting new patients. Sometimes, the reception staff gets extremely busy.

As a result, not all phone calls are returned right away. Upon three days going by and no response is received, place another call to the office. A simply follow-up like this can confirm whether or not marking an appointment is possible.

Of course, if there is an emergency problem present then you should go to the nearest dental clinic right away. Waiting too long if a major emergency has occurred could make things far, far more difficult to treat.

It does bear mentioning that all appointments at a dental clinic should be taken seriously. The annual checkup at a dentist’s examines the teeth for serious tooth decay that might not even show signs. While bleeding gums and painful cavities are a definitive sign of a major problem, third stage tooth decay can occur without any signs or symptoms whatsoever.

As anyone who works at a dental clinic will point out, once teeth enter the fourth stage of tooth decay, extractions may be unavoidable. Oral cancer screening are also performed during routine visits. Keep this fact in mind when thinking about putting off a visit to a dental clinic.